Writing from home requires discipline. Here are 10 freelancing resources to keep you on task.

Ten Freelancer Resources

Sometimes, looking for freelance writing resources online feels a little bit like getting sucked into a black hole.

There’s so much out there.

Having access to pages of resources may clutter up my bookmarks bar, but it’s not inherently a bad thing.

It just means there are plenty of places to find inspiration, motivation, and advice.

Below are some of the different avenues I’ve found in my my hunt for freelance writing resources.

Finding a Gig

From job boards to perfecting your pitch, there are places to help you find and land a writing gig.

Fiverr
If you need a break from traditional job boards, look into Fiverr. Instead of scrolling through jobs postings, freelancers create “gigs” based on their areas of expertise and then are contacted by potential clients.

Freelance Writing Jobs
True to its name, this site posts freelance, remote, and online writing jobs each weekday. It also has its own job board and an entire section devoted to freelance resources.

Who Pays Writers
This site features a crowd-sourced list of publications that pay writers and their respective rates. Details are supplied by writers who already have been though the process. You can learn how quickly the publication paid, the rights (if any) a freelancer received, and details of the overall experience for the writer.

Go Freelance: How to Pitch
Under Mediabistro’s  “Membership” tab, you can find this treasure trove of pitching guidelines for specific publications. While there’s a fee to become a member and access this information, it could be worthwhile if you’re struggling to get your pitches right.

Mediabistro How to Pitch Section

Helpful Sites, Apps, Podcasts, and Communities


From my research, I’ve learned that freelance writing resources come in all shapes and sizes. Whether you’re looking for some guidance when it comes to benefits or a podcast to listen to with your morning coffee, there are a variety of resources to check out.

Freelancers Union
This organization offers benefits, advocacy, community, and resources for freelancers. Any kind of freelancer can sign up to become a member for free. Benefits include health insurance and liability insurance. The union also has resources to help you handle less-than-glamorous freelancing issues, like client nonpayment.

The Freelancer by Contently
Contently developed this site to cover relevant news, trends, and advice for freelancers. In addition to posting jobs, it publishes articles on various topics. An example: How to land repeat clients. If you feel inclined, you even can create a Contently portfolio to show off your work to potential clients.

PocketSuite
When it comes to apps, PocketSuite can handle a good portion of your business-managing needs. The basic app is free and facilitates scheduling, invoicing, credit-card charging, and messaging. Users also can opt to pay for versions with more features, including automated appointment reminders or online booking through your website, Facebook, or Instagram pages.

The Accidental Creative
Personally, I love podcasts. It’s because they give me a chance to take my eyes off the computer screen, but still feel productive. The Accidental Creative provides perspective on balancing and achieving goals in life and work — something that’s particularly relevant to freelancers.

The International Freelancer
Facebook groups are a great way to find communities and stay connected. Associated with award-winning journalist and author Mridu Khullar Relph’s writing community, The International Freelancer offers a space for freelancers to support each other and offer advice.

#Freelance
Last year, we outlined some of the best Slack communities for creatives, so this next online community already may be on your radar. Digital Freelancer’s #Freelance chat is a 24/7 community helping freelancers expand their network, receive feedback, and get advice from their peers. The channel includes industry-focused sub-channels and weekly interviews with industry experts.

Slack Community Freelance Chat

After all of this, I’m sure the top of your browser is starting to resemble an overcrowded filing cabinet.

If you start feeling overwhelmed or lost, just remember — there are a lot of resources out there. You just need to find what works for you.

Let us know in the comments what resources you’ve found to help navigate your freelance career.

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Jennifer (Davids) Flynn is a customer content specialist at PR Newswire. By day, she reads releases and advises clients on content best practices. By night (and weekends) she spends most of her time reading fiction and hanging out with her puppy.

One thought on “Writing from home requires discipline. Here are 10 freelancing resources to keep you on task.

  1. Great piece. The ultimate question for some writers as social creatures is this: Are we cut out for the freelance life? I wasn’t. Working at home was lonely, and camping at coffee shops didn’t help my desire for community. (Plus, have you every heard the same Starbucks soundtrack for 50 days straight?) Communal spaces such as WeWork might help, but that costs $$$. After freelancing full time for 7 years, I have maybe one other piece of hard-won wisdom: Fly low to the ground financially. Live simply. To keep my mortgage paid, pay off my credit cards, etc., I had to produce 12 freelance pieces a week. That, and the utter unknown as to when a client would drop me, had a big impact on my health. Freelancing can be liberating–but it’s not for everyone, and if you have a shot at a full-time job with smiling faces and comrades (as I did), consider trading in the shingle for a cubicle. I couldn’t wait to say goodbye to quarterly taxes, audits (freelancers are 300 percent more likely to get an IRS audit), funding my own insurance, tapping my IRA when things got lean, and working insane hours. Other than that, full-time freelancing was OK.

    Liked by 1 person

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